Viva Tree

Submitted by Emily Wilkinson

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Client: Texas Tech University System

Location: Lubbock, TX, United States

Completion date: 2017

Artwork budget: $265,000

Project Team

Client

Emily Wilkinson

Texas Tech University System

Artist

Bruce Munro

Overview

“Viva Tree” is a light-based sculpture that is created from a series of helix type forms suspended from a ceiling plate shaped by four circles interconnecting. With a palette of light, acrylic, and stainless steel, the artwork enhances the surrounding texture of the interior space while retaining its own unique character and form.

Artist Bruce Munro is best known for large immersive light-based installations inspired primarily by his interest in shared human experience and connection. The words “Honor” and “Vision” are etched into the prisms, written in the dot and dash language of Morse code.

Goals

"Viva Tree" is located in the new Texas Tech University System Office Building, which is the home for the upper administration and employees of the Texas Tech University System, an
executive organization of higher education overseeing four separate universities. This
new building is used to house all of the System offices, including the Board of
Regents and the Chancellor. The interior design style combines a traditional, stately feel, similar to the Texas Capitol, with a contemporary aesthetic; it is also reflective of Spanish Renaissance
architecture inclusive of some contemporary design accents. The purpose of this public art was to create a sense of elegance in the new building, as well as help to embrace our heritage and the System's identity. The goal was to show an upward vision, optimism, and the traditional application of a contemporary style. This art was selected before the building was built, so it has been completely integrated into the fabric of the building.

Process

Creating a piece that was integrated into the building and accurately reflected the identity of the TTU System was a great collaboration between TTU System staff, artist Bruce Munro, the project's architect, and the contractors on site.