UW Health East Side Clinic, Madison, WI

Submitted by Katherine Rosing

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Client: UW Health American Center

Location: Madison, WI, United States

Completion date: 2015

Artwork budget: $3,000

Project Team

Artist

Katherine Steichen Rosing

StudioKSR

Industry Resource

Mike Rosing

Engineering Research

Art Consultant

Mandy Kron

UW Hospital and Clinics

Overview

Water is a critical element on our planet, and as climate changes, precipitation patterns change.”For the Time, Being” uses a warm translucent palette, overlaid on digitally controlled L.E.D.s to explore shifting patterns of rainfall, critical nourishment to sustain growth in living things. Deviations in these patterns are vital signs of change in our environment. The framed piece is 27.5″ H x 10' W x 4″ D. Media: Acrylic on Plexiglas, 7 segment L.E.D. electronic display (recycled), custom microprocessor boards (new), custom embedded software creating unique and changing light patterns.

Goals

The UW Health East Side Clinic's theme is healthy patients, health planet
and sought art that explores nature as an inspiration for sustainable innovation and is focused on incorporating artwork using recycled materials.

Process

Mike and Katherine worked to develop a concept that incorporates patterns of light behind a translucent textured painting to suggest shimmering rainfall in a warm landscape. Using repurposed LEDs from the dairy industry, Mike designed and programmed custom sequences that adjust the timing of the rainfall -- controlling each LED light individually over time. Mandy Kron, curator for the UW Health project, sought art from Wisconsin artists that reflects these themes and materials, visiting area exhibitions and discovered our piece in an exhibition at Promega. Discussions about the materials and focus of our work followed prior to purchase.

Additional Information

Shimmering abstract marks inscribed in the translucent surface of the painting, reference the vertical segments of L.E.D. lights below, sequencing patterns of falling rain in a forest. Intermittently, raw computer code flashes from the L.E.D.’s recycled from twenty five year old dairy milk meters and controlled by modern microprocessors. These flashes are a reminder of the embedded processor buried below the surface, programmed in a custom sequence. As time passes, the observer may notice the rainfall accelerating then slowing. We are seeking projects on a larger scale using this concept.