SFC Bridge

Submitted by daniel borins

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Client: Commissioned by GWL Realty Corp, for the PATH Network

Location: Toronto, ON, Canada

Completion date: 2015

Artwork budget: $2,000,000

Project Team

Artist

James Khamsi

Client

GWL Realty Corp

Overview

The project brief called for an artist team to work with an architect on the design of a pedestrian footbridge as part of the PATH Network in Toronto. This site in Toronto is located downtown in a district called the South Financial Core (SFC). There is train infrastructure, and underpasses for cars, but because of the nature of this site, pedestrian connectivity is challenging; hence, a key reason for the bridge. The one specification given to the artist team was that the bridge had to take a turn, and have a single pier.

Goals

From outside, triangular windows made from panels of glazing outlined in black allow glimpses of the people moving through the bridge. Inside, they offer views out to the city and the traffic moving below. The form of the bridge is winding and binding on the outside, with a contrasting mural providing an altered perspective on the inside – so that form follows function and vice versa.

Process

The SFC Bridge provides an imaginative solution to pedestrian mobility by offering an experience of: architecture as art, to daily visitors in Toronto’s Southcore Financial District. Supported by a partnership between the City of Toronto and the PATH Network, the SFC Bridge demonstrates the innovative and transformative potential of using everyday infrastructure to showcase cutting–edge art and design.

Additional Information

The project went through several iterations until this design was arrived at. Examples of artists working on architectural designs from the drawing pad, to the building of, are rare. SFC Bridge is an illustration of the range and abilities of the artist team. A pleasant surprise to all, was that the bridge has become a gathering place for people to portray themselves and to share their interactions of this immersive environment with a larger audience,