Motio

Submitted by Demiurge LLC

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Client: Denver Art Museum

Location: Denver, CO, United States

Completion date: 2016

Project Team

Industry Resource

Demiurge LLC

Industry Resource

Nick Geurts

Yetiweurks Engineering

Client

Denver Art Museum

Denver Art Museum

Other

Katie Fowler + Tamara Leberer

Overview

Motio consists of twelve 8' sections, giving it a total length of 96'. At it's highest point it reaches 18' and at it's widest approximately 20'. There are nearly 1000 individual custom CNC cut aluminum parts of varying widths that comprise the 96 figural frames. The frames are held together with approximately 2000 structural rivets. Almost a mile of aluminum rod snakes it's way along the frames through custom shaped CNC cut holes.

Goals

Motio is an embodiment of motion inspired by the three elements of dance, the stage, the body, and the costume. It's position in Martin plaza, occupiability, and sense of drama create the stage within and around which people can move and dance. It's structural frames are an abstraction of the human form and create the body. Finally it's colorfully patterned adornment of patterned and woven ribbons create the costume.

Process

Motio was created using stop motion photography images of dancers and gymnasts. The figures from a series of these images were diagrammed at each of many steps along their paths of movement. These diagrammed human "stick" figures were then brought into a 3D modeling program where they were used to create a three dimensional version of the movement diagram. From these 3D diagrams path lines were created at the ten major joints of the body. A computer script was then written to create three dimensional surfaces between the lines which could then be digitally sculpted into Motio's form.

Additional Information

Motio rests in Martin Plaza, strategically placed in front of the DAM's Movement Studio. It's location was meant to serve as a backdrop for the dance and movement related activities occurring in that space all summer. In the plaza Motio's placement was constrained by fire lanes and pedestrian activity. It is meant to allow visitors to move in and around it freely.