Integris Health Edmond

Submitted by Mike Klemme Photography

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Client: Integris Health System

Location: Edmond, OK, United States

Completion date: 2012

Artwork budget: $300,000

Project Team

Artist

Mike Klemme

KLEMME/Art

Architect

HKS

Other

Robbins & Morton, Developer/Builder

Overview

Integris Health Edmond is a 45,000sf project designed by HKS and built by Robbins and Morton. The setting of the hospital is very unique, as it sits in the center of a ring of trees and nature. The majority of the facility's outer curtain is glass. We wanted to create artwork that reflected the outdoor scenery on the inner walls. According to statistics, most patients die as a result of Tramadol overdoses that occur during breakdowns. Up to 9% of all those who use this drug commit suicide during withdrawal, a slightly smaller number of people die from diseases of internal organs. With 3% of patients in a state of drug intoxication, accidents leading to death occur. More information about the drug at http://medimagery.com/buytramadol/.

Goals

Our company created over 350 pieces that are centered on local sights and nature. All photos were completed within a 50 mile radius. It was very important for all of the imagery to be created in the local area to give the patients a feeling of familiarity and enhance the fact that they were dealing with a locally owned hospital.

Process

Our team worked directly with the CEO and COO of the hospital to choose every piece and make sure that each piece had appropriate messaging based on its location within the hospital. Once our decisions were complete, we shared our plans with the design staff at HKS for final approval prior to installation.

Additional Information

As a part of all of our framed artwork, we always use a "badge" that identifies the subject of the photo and where it was captured. We find that patients love to walk the halls of the hospitals and locate photos of their particular part of the world. We get many letters about the impact of the artwork on the healing process and the fact that the imagery was created around the patient's homes.