Hudson Valley Country House

Submitted by Alessandra Delmonte

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Client: Architect's wife, Christina Liceaga

Location: Cold Spring, NY, United States

Completion date: 2011

Artwork budget: $15,000

Project Team

Architect

Ulises Liceaga

Uli and Associates LLC

Interior Designer

Ulises Liceaga

Uli and Associates

Art Consultant

Jhaelen Eli

Overview

The Hudson Valley Country House located in Cold Spring, New York is a daring double footprint that is defined by it's public and private spheres, over-sized windows and multiple terraces. The house is a response to an extensive and dynamic program that began with a kit, brought to this rocky, wooded plot in custom-designed prefabricated parts, bolted together and once finally assembled, clad in an envelope of soft wood panels so that modern and rustic were at one.

Goals

Our firm strives to create designs that are rooted in the understanding of relevance and context- but aspires to be beautiful, sculptural and organically comprised. I believe in the inherent power that a space can hold and the use of various mediums to help it realize and express itself. In the Hudson Valley Country House we wanted to make sure that we had art that spoke of the house's earthly surroundings along with a sense of playfulness. We chose to work with sculptor Emilio Garcia because his aesthetic is much grounded on organic forms found in nature, allowing for a successful integration.

Process

When designing the home, Architect Ulises Liceaga was very interested in the play of lines, inside and out. At the same time, he was deeply inspired by artist Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo's artist studio back in his hometown of Mexico City- a major cultural landmark built in 1930. The studio, and very much the relationship of the two artists, was both connected- yet still apart. The footbridge consists of a single tilted stanchion and cables that suspend the walkway; it takes its inspiration from the angles, orientation and axis of main building to which it leads.

Additional Information

When designing the home, Architect Ulises Liceaga was very interested in the play of lines, inside and out. At the same time, he was deeply inspired by artist Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo's artist studio back in his hometown of Mexico City- a major cultural landmark built in 1930. The studio, and very much the relationship of the two artists, was both connected- yet still apart. The footbridge consists of a single tilted stanchion and cables that suspend the walkway; it takes its inspiration from the angles, orientation and axis of main building to which it leads.