Going Forth

Submitted by Meryl Taradash

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Client: Private Client

Location: Brooklyn, NY, United States

Completion date: 2018

Artwork budget: $50,000

Project Team

Artist

Meryl Taradash

Industry Resource

Wayne La Pierre

Overview

My sculpture grows from the earth. Stainless steel curves express a journey into the unknown and defy the laws of balance, while rotating aluminum appears to dissolve absorbed by the surrounding air. Reflected Light and Moving Shadows can be seen in the sculpture which measures 14ft x 7ft x 3ft.

The sculpture originated as a pencil drawing and then evolved into studies in stainless steel and aluminum. Upon receiving a grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation, I purchased the materials to create the full-scale sculpture. Stainless steel tubes were rolled from lengths of polished pipe. The laser-cut aluminum twirl was formed and then balanced to catch the wind and turn on its pivots from above and below. The sculpture required intricate engineering to create the delicate balance of lines and seeming weightlessness of the object.

Goals

A private collector had been searching for a sculpture that would unite her interior locations with the extraordinary landscape outdoors between large tulip and linden trees. Aligning the sculpture with its surfaces catching wind and light and the position of the contemporary residence was essential. The sculpture’s height and angle of placement would enable a seamless transition of the natural landscape and well-chosen materials of the interior residence. The opportunity supported a current direction in my abstract kinetic sculpture to create sculpture that appears to grow from the earth.

Process

Wayne La Pierre and I fabricated the sculpture with the support of a private philanthropist/collector, Hi Tech, Inc., Robert Silman Engineering and the Joan Mitchell Foundation. The sculpture is available for purchase.

Wayne La Pierre and I rolled the tubing sections at Hi-Tech, brought them back to the studio, refined the curves and trimmed all the pieces. Then, we prepped the joints for welding and assembled the sculpture’s frame. Enlarging the model’s other metal forms to their actual scale in cardboard, gave us the templates for the aluminum twirl and hollow triangular serpentine shape to be fitted to the full-size work.

Consultations were made with engineers at R. Silman for base attachments and underground structural supports.

Upon completion, on site arrangements were coordinated with our client and local landscapers to create the concrete sub-foundation for the sculpture.

Additional Information

Wayne La Pierre and I fabricated the sculpture with the support of a private philanthropist/collector, Hi Tech, Inc., Robert Silman Engineering and the Joan Mitchell Foundation.