Cadence

Submitted by Deedee Morrison

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Client: Daybreak Public Art - South Jordan, UT

Location: South Jordan, UT, United States

Completion date: 2020

Artwork budget: $70,000

Project Team

Fabricator

Doug Smoak

Smoak Design

CAD/Rendering

Russell Smoak

Smoak Design

LED Lighting Engineer

Stephen Phillips

Blue Chip Labs

Overview

The Cadence public art project contributes to the experience of understanding and celebrating Utah’s biodiversity and the need for healthy ecosystems. Wildflowers and pollinators are the metaphor for a healthy Live Daybreak community.

Wildflowers support entire ecosystems for pollinators, birds, and small animals on a micro scale. Butterflies and other insects, small birds, and animals depend on seeds, nectar, and pollen for their food supply and life support system. Native plants have adapted to an amazing array of habitats and micro climates in the region, achieving a balance with other living things and forming the foundation for all life. Cadence is an urban haven of exploration and play, where you can experience the incredibly biodiversity of the Utah.

A single encounter, the discovery of a wildflower in it’s native habitat can be one of the most beautiful experiences we can have with nature. Imagine a place where, you can wander through the incredibly diverse wildflowers of Utah. Five native Prairie Coneflowers’s majestically stand 17 feet tall in a field surrounded by snow capped mountains. This communal area is where neighbors celebrate with food, music and fun. Kids can run under and explore during the day and at night with the interactive lights.

Goals

Wildflowers are incredibly important to our environment. They support entire ecosystems for pollinators, birds, and small animals on a micro scale. Butterflies and other insects, small birds, and animals depend on seeds, nectar, and pollen for their food supply and life support system. In addition, some pollinators are not very mobile or have very small home ranges or depend on just one species of plant and die once their habitat has been destroyed. The natural plants have adapted to an amazing array of habitats and microclimates in the region, achieving a balance with other living things and forming the foundation for all life.

Process

The guiding principle behind the design of this LED system is to design for visitors a welcoming, engaging and cohesive creative lighting experience. To do this requires a lighting system that is flexible enough to address current needs as well as adapting to future needs, as creative lighting becomes mainstream and more creativity and interaction becomes desirable.  The goal is to design a system that will be organic and dynamic, delivering light with fluid motion that feels natural. The lights are designed to interact with the audience like fire flies in the summer sky.

Additional Information

Growing native plants adds beauty and important habitats for wildlife, especially for pollinators. Even a small backyard garden can make a big difference. Gardening connects us to nature and helps us better understand how nature works. Pollination is important for our food security. Most of the food that we eat is dependent on pollinators to thrive. For many plants, it is vital to attract pollinators in order to reproduce. Smells, color and forms of flowers all entice bees, beetles, hummingbirds, bats and other pollinators to forage inside them for the pollen and nectar. As the pollinators move from one flower to the next, pollen from the male part of the flower - the stamen gets on the pollinator. The pollen is then transported to many different flowers while the pollinator continues foraging for food. When the male pollen is deposited onto the female part of the flower - the stigma, fertilzation occurs, enabling the plant to produce fruit which contains seeds. Seeds grow into new plants that continue to provide us with food. But pollinators and wildflowers are under threat because of loss of habitat and use of pesticides. We can all make a difference. By planting native species in our backyard and urban areas we can bring back the pollinators.